Posted in Fitness/Health, Uncategorized, Walking

I Think; I’ll Walk

I like to walk every morning.  I have written often of the physical benefits derived from walking.  These gains comprise a list too long to cover in a single article or blog post, and I intend to cover some of the individual advantages in upcoming posts, but today I would speak to the emotional and cerebral rewards gained through time spent in motion.

I have been in North Carolina for the past four months spending time with my son and three grandchildren.  I have cherished this time with them but find that my opportunities for the long walk through nature, an integral part of my writing process, are severely impeded.  There are places to walk here, but as a lifelong resident of Oregon I have found the heat and humidity here to be daunting in my attempts to walk regularly.  My schedule does not allow for the early morning walks that might preclude the oppressive heat, and the evenings are only now, near the end of my stay, cooling enough to allow the occasional evening walk.

Walk
Walk to relieve stress and let your mind soar.

In Oregon I would walk every morning with my best friend, a lab mix named Chubby, in preparation for the writing day.  During this time I could lose myself in the natural settings while praying, meditating, and working through the thoughts and ideas for the writing that would follow.  This mobile quiet time invariably leads to several lines of thought from which I could find a starting point for the day’s work.  My production is limited only by the time that I allowed myself to write.

Here at Fort Bragg, with my schedule with the children precluding these early morning brainstorming sessions, I have found that the writing comes much harder and I am more willing to turn to all of the other chores and pursuits that pull at me rather than struggling through the painful process of dragging subjects from a mind not primed through ambling inspiration.

I find myself dreaming of the time that I can once again stroll through the towering Douglas firs and along wild streams in the chill of a Northwest dawn.

Walk; Relieve stress

A morning walk serves to set the mood for the rest of the day.  No matter what tasks await you, an early morning hike can make you more productive throughout the day.

A walk can remove the stress felt for the job ahead.  If you have left over anger or depression from the previous day it soothes your frayed nerves and resets your emotional equilibrium.  It eases depression and anxiety.  It stimulates your problem-solving capability.  It can move you closer to your true purpose, re-focusing your vision of the future.  You are more inclined to accept your shortcomings and of those whom you encounter.

The morning walk is not the only way to benefit mentally.  A walk in the evening is a wonderful way to release the stress and frustrations of a difficult day, renewing your spirit and preparing you for a restful sleep and preparing you to meet a new day with enhanced vigor.   A peaceful night can free your subconscious mind to problem-solve and present you with solutions upon awakening.

Walking is the easiest, most natural method that you will encounter for controlling the stress endemic in our busy lives.  No matter what the approaching day entails, walking with your thoughts will clarify and simplify the solutions that you seek.

The physical health promoted by daily hikes will serve to enhance your mental acuity as well.  A healthy body promotes a healthy mind, and, as previously mentioned, the physical benefits from walking are copious.

Get out and walk daily.  It is the cheapest and most effective therapy that you can find.

To find some good nature walks to boost your creativity and reduce your stress try the link below:

http://alltrails.com/

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